Blow waves to bullets

A normal infantry section commander’s knowledge of haircuts ends with what the Army Dress Manual allows.

CAPTIONLance Corporal Emily Drummond at the 2023 Chief of Army Symposium in Perth. Story by Warrant Officer Class Two Max Bree.

But one member from the 11th/28th Battalion, The Royal Western Australian Regiment (11/28RWAR), is just as familiar with scissors and a curling iron as she is with a rifle and body armour.

Lance Corporal Emily Drummond was born in Kalgoorlie and grew up in Dunsborough, before leaving school by Year 10 to become a hairdresser.

Inspired by her aunt, Lance Corporal Drummond joined the Army Reserve in 2016 and went on several full-time contracts that included deployments on Operation Resolute and to India late last year.

She was part of an Aussie platoon that worked with an Indian infantry battalion, to see how the Commonwealth armies could integrate.

“At the start we were doing drills next to them, even though it was British-based; it was different, though the foundation was the same,” Lance Corporal Drummond said.

Soldiers from each country demonstrated how they conducted activities, such us urban room clearances, worked out a way to do it together, then ran through as a combined team.

While there, Lance Corporal Drummond met Indian women who’d recently been allowed to enter combat roles.

“They were blown away by the things that I’ve done,” she said.

“It made me feel so lucky being a woman living in Australia. I have a lot more opportunities.

“I loved being able to show them what they could be able to do, and hopefully, eventually would be able to.”

Lance Corporal Drummond was part of the Regimental Sergeant Major – Army’s Junior Leader Fellowship that ran from August 28-31, in conjunction with the Chief of Army Symposium in Perth.

Participants toured military bases in the area, attended seminars and heard from Australian and international military leaders.

This led Lance Corporal Drummond to think about being more adaptable as a leader.

“The soldiers and people joining the Army are changing,” she said.

“You’ve got to adapt your leadership style.”

Apart from hairdressing, Lance Corporal Drummond also became a civilian personal trainer, and is now a combat fitness leader at Alpha Coy, 11/28RWAR, in Bunbury.

While blow waves and perms seem a world away from combat shooting and urban assaults, Lance Corporal Drummond’s skills with the scissors still come in handy.

“I do the emergency haircuts when the boys get in trouble from the Command Sergeant Major,” she said.


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3 thoughts on “Blow waves to bullets

  • 17/09/2023 at 11:03 am
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    This old grunt from the sixties has the same questions!

    Reply
  • 17/09/2023 at 10:14 am
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    Perhaps someone can help out an old Grunt from the 1970’s.

    Is this Woman is proper Infantry Section Commander?
    Does she carry and run to the loads and times as I did?
    Are there special conditions of her Duty due to her Gender?

    I’m all for letting the Ladies having a go and she’s obvious fit and spent a lot of money on tattoo’s but, I have trouble believing she could competitively compete in the Gloucester Cup, and that should surely be a minimal yard-stick for Australian Infantryperson performance?

    DUTY FIRST

    Reply
    • 20/09/2023 at 12:34 pm
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      Hey Michael!

      Above mentioned infantry Secco here.
      My goal entering into the infantry was always that I could never ask something of my soldiers that I myself could not complete. I make sure to pass the men’s fitness standards and I march alongside them with my pack on with all the same gear in it. We also have to complete all the same promotion courses. I can’t speak for other women in the role, but I certainly haven’t received any special treatment. I would say I have actually had to work harder to prove my worth because of people’s views of women in combat roles.
      I definitely agree that it’s not for everyone (men and women included) but try not to judge a book by its gender.

      Thank you for your service.

      -Young Grunt from the 20s

      Reply

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