Army changes basic training at Kapooka – AGAIN!

Recruit training at Kapooka should be completed 25 per cent faster under the new Army Initial Foundation Training continuum, currently in the second stage of trials.

CAPTIONAn Army recruit from 1st Recruit Training Battalion Kapooka takes a sight picture through an F89 Minimi at Blamey Barracks Kapooka, NSW. Photos by Leading Aircraftman Adam Abela.

The course has three, 21-day modules to progress recruits from induction through to combat behaviours and foundation warfighting – marching out soldiers with the same skills delivered on the previous Army Recruit Course.

Commandant Land Combat College Brigadier Jason Groat said updates to training were needed to ensure more soldiers could be trained quickly if required.

“The trials we are running at Kapooka are showing us that we can continue to generate well-trained soldiers in less time by making some changes to the way we have done business in the past,” Brigadier Groat said.

“If there are areas where we need to make adjustments, we will do so.”

CAPTIONArmy recruits from 1st Recruit Training Battalion Kapooka conduct a wall vault during physical training at Blamey Barracks.

The new continuum is designed to be a common pathway for full and part-time recruits.

It is also planned to become part of initial entry training (IET) for staff cadets entering the Royal Military College in Duntroon from January 2024.

The training modules – A, B and C – represent scaffolded learning with conditions-based ‘off-ramps’ designed to enable scalability.

Module A is common for reserve and full-time recruits and focuses on embedding combat behaviours and meeting mandatory training requirements.

Reserve recruits who finish Module A will undertake further training at their units prior to starting IET courses.

CAPTIONAn Army recruit from 1st Recruit Training Battalion Kapooka presents arms during drill practice at Blamey Barracks.

Module B covers service mastery and additional application of combat behaviours. Recruits gain further weapon qualifications and undertake the combat marksmanship continuum up to Rifle Practice 3A.

It also contains additional physical conditioning and resilience training.

Module C fully prepares full-time recruits with foundation warfighting skills and qualifications needed to move onto IET for their respective corps or trade.

The continuum started its second trial on August 22 and, once completed, will be reviewed for effectiveness before being considered to fully replace the current Army Recruit Course in January 2024.

The modularised nature means recruit training could be quickly adapted to changing strategic circumstances.

“Army could rapidly generate Module A qualified soldiers in response to a large-scale natural disaster or pandemic,” Brigadier Groat said.

“Another possibility enabled would be the rapid upskilling of Reserve soldiers in response to other strategic circumstances.”

CAPTIONAustralian Army recruits from 1st Recruit Training Battalion Kapooka conduct a stretcher carry during physical training at Blamey Barracks.

Major changes to Army-recruit training at Kapooka” were previously announced in 2019 – and examined in more detail in CONTACT magazine issue 63.

Army Reserve soldier foundation training reduced to just three weeks” was also announced relatively recently – in May this year.

 

 


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14 thoughts on “Army changes basic training at Kapooka – AGAIN!

  • 07/10/2023 at 9:20 pm
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    I was a chocko for 23 years and did my recruit course at puckapunyal for 14 days at age 17 were the nachos did there’s . 14 days of hell was enough the only thing we didn’t do that kapooka did was throw Granades . The IET training came when you went back to your unit (. If ya went back )
    If the ADF wants to build numbers up in reserves go back to a 14 day recruit course most employers will except 14 days off not 3 , 6 weeks . Ginger Beer.

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  • 25/09/2023 at 12:30 pm
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    Admittedly I went through Kapooka over 30 years ago, but they were pretty full days up until 9pm. I could understand this decision if there was a lot of inefficiency or standing around (unlike later when you got to your unit). I’m really not sure what they could cut back, apart from drill which was a big component.

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  • 25/09/2023 at 10:37 am
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    As a training technologist for more than 40 years, I can only shudder in horror at what has happened to some elements of training in Defence today. The incessant pruning back of training as a solution to ‘problems’ is the oldest trick in the book, and is often used by the senior officers. Mostly it creates new problems, which are then left to be addressed by the next batch of managers who come through.

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  • 25/09/2023 at 9:23 am
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    Hi All. I’m not shocked to be reading this and I suspect our involvement training the Ukrainian cannon fodder has given our brass some ideas.

    I’d like to be mildly optimistic and suggest the shortened time frames may be from Groat realising he could delete the Woke components and thus just have the relevant content. Obviously there is a loss in hours but I suspect the woke stuff just divides and demoralises recruits and so having it removed might have some further obvious implications.

    Who am I kidding – ha ha. They won’t get rid of the LGBTQ pronouns and other such unbelievable training. What was I thinking.

    I’m not sure of the details but there’s nothing like a dose of reality to wake the ‘awake but woke’ folks up and realise they need to change their plans as the only adults in the room.

    Maybe GROAT has something planned?

    Some interesting things on the horizon for December to occur or be announced, however this could be crap if getting spread by low levels – I pray we all get to see Christmas in, this year. At the rate we are going I suspect it’s going to be a very difficult time in our history for the next 5 -10 years. Please may I be wrong.

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  • 25/09/2023 at 6:43 am
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    There are two sides to this discussion.
    One if training can be reduced and the same standards met why did it take so long to implement and who is then accountable for the years waste of tax dollars.

    Two from my experience any reduction in training reduces outcomes and proficiency. Foundation training is the most critical of all, it is from the foundation ( basic training) that the potential of each soldier is built. Smaller foundations in training are generally only ever accepted when you agree to a high turnover environment that does not incur additional high cost training for the replacement.

    Training our military personnel is a high cost and it involves life. Does this mean Canberra has forgotten to look up as they walk out the front door and now sees all recruits as cannon fodder?

    Leadership in our forces is pathetically weak, traditional routines around developing discipline have been manifesting since the 2000s and the fact that our military leadership has not stood up to political parties suggests to me that if any change is required its the military leadership for their lack of action.

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  • 24/09/2023 at 6:55 pm
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    Seems like another WOKE cop out foisted upon the Army by the “out of touch with reality” gang in Canberra

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  • 24/09/2023 at 4:25 pm
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    You mirror my thoughts exactly. Our forces don’t even compare to the Chinese or Malaysian armies. We are the weak link!

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  • 24/09/2023 at 4:10 pm
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    This is the consequence of having a woke madman like Angus Campbell at the helm. The top brass are more concerned with their political ambitions than with upholding our army standards & traditions.

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  • 24/09/2023 at 10:54 am
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    The above are all very valid comments and points. To me this just smakes wokeness and political correctness to no end, just what ever will these numpties think of next. ????????

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  • 24/09/2023 at 10:33 am
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    This is terrific news!

    Having decreased our training to match our lowered enlistment standards, to match similar levels of our outdated equipment, tactics and technology, we have successfully achieved full ”Interoperability” with our U.S. Allies.

    We can now say the A.D.F. has never been a weaker shadow of it’s former admirable self, and is finally a seamless segment of the U.S. Military.

    (A Note for any Vets reading.) The Russian Armed Forces are now widely acknowledged as having the Worlds best Veteran Benefits and conditions. Looking at the D.V.A. performance are we sure we’re supporting the right side?

    Neutrality for Australia.

    YANKEE GO HOME

    Peace.

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    • 24/09/2023 at 4:24 pm
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      You mirror my thoughts exactly. Our forces don’t even compare to the Chinese or Malaysian armies. We are the weak link!

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  • 24/09/2023 at 9:22 am
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    So dropping the fitness standard – then the length…Are they changing physiology of the applicants? Basic physiology requires 12 weeks for neurophysiological adaptations to training so….if I was ADF I would wait for the findings of the Royal Commission to come out.

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  • 24/09/2023 at 9:03 am
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    “combat behaviours and foundation warfighting”: now there are terms I never used in my career, certainly as a course commander of recruits.
    I wonder if the ARA still has Wednesday afternoons off for sport. If so, that would save another 10% were they to get rid of it.

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    • 25/09/2023 at 10:31 am
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      I would think that most sports played today in the ADF are way too dangerous and should be reigned in. Some sports injuries are horrendous and this must only frighten the others who are doing their IET. Sensible team sports like marbles, quoits and pin the tail on the donkey should be introduced urgently to reduce the risks.

      Reply

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