B Squadron gets extra sting with Wasp

2nd Cavalry Regiment Australian light armoured vehicles (ASLAVs) fired 25mm rounds to neutralise targets spotted by the unit’s Wasp uncrewed aerial system (UAS) during Exercise Eagle Walk in Townsville.

CAPTIONSoldiers from Army’s 2nd Cavalry Regiment conduct live-fire training on Australian light armoured vehicles at Townsville Field Training Area, Queensland. Story by Corporal Luke Bellman. Photos by Trooper Dana Millington.

Troopers watching UAS video feeds relayed target locations to gunners who massed firepower on threats appearing at different distances until they were destroyed, neutralised or withdrawn.

As part of the activity, vehicles first adopt ‘turret down’ positions with only the sighting system exposed above terrain, and only moved to ‘hull down’ positions, which reveal the turret, immediately before firing.

Officer Commanding B Squadron Major Guy Wagner said the serials helped confirm that drivers, gunners and crew commanders understood the correct techniques before progressing to more advanced unit training.

CAPTIONLance Corporal Justin MacLennan, of the 2nd Cavalry Regiment, launches a Wasp all environment uncrewed aerial system during live-fire training at Townsville Field Training Area.

This includes each crew member safely engaging a number of static and mobile targets by day and night.

“We are enforcing combat behaviours. Just like dismounted soldiers employ combat behaviours when engaging with the EF88, we employ it when engaging with vehicle weapon systems,” Major Wagner said.

In addition to the ASLAV’s 25mm M242 Bushmaster chain gun and machine guns, selected vehicles were also fitted with remote weapon stations and surveillance suites.

Crew commander Corporal Matthew Miles said individual vehicle control was a lifeline for crew safety.

“We’re picking safe routes for our drivers to get through, making sure our guns are in arc,” he said.

“It’s our responsibility to keep the crew safe.

“Before going out field we do a lot of crew battle training in barracks, running through all the basic drills.”

 

 


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5 thoughts on “B Squadron gets extra sting with Wasp

  • 17/03/2024 at 2:11 pm
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    Now is the time for the ADF to start promoting UAV competitions across the country to train up a whole new cadre of younger folk with the skill sets needed to utilise UAVs in competitive (combative) scenarios.
    If Ukraine and Israle/gaza has shown us anything it is that UAVs are going to be a key player in every theatre of ops, be it Infantry, armour, artillery, intelligence or supply. As part of the integrated new battlefield we need to see past the old style of last week and move quickly to adopt the hard lessons being learned overseas. Seeing as how China probably makes most of the UAVs one could expect them to be a predominate player in any future conflict, regardless of the location or enemy.

    Reply
  • 17/03/2024 at 1:19 pm
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    What sort of seditious talk is this. Iain Scott obviously fails to fully appreciate the the hardships endured by the “top heavy crew in Canberra”. Everything from hot summers to cold winters experienced in the National capital, the constant morning and afternoon battles with ACT traffic, and the never ending stress of trying to look busy and, more importantly, useful. It isn’t the bowl of cherries some of those who enjoy the fresh air and sunshine of the Townsville training areas might imagine.
    I could go on, but I’m sure you get my drift.

    Reply
  • 17/03/2024 at 11:58 am
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    I fully support Matt Plenty comments! If UAV protection has not been implemented now I certainly hope to hear that the powers at be are beginning research or more hopefully purchasing immediate UAV kits for our vehicles.

    Reply
  • 17/03/2024 at 10:38 am
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    Great article and training – similar to Ian Scott’s comment I am curious when we will start to see the ‘lessons learned’ from Ukraine appear on our vehicles… simple things such as UAV protection covers above hatches may make all the difference to survivability… and in our context would be SunSmart too!

    Reply
  • 17/03/2024 at 9:22 am
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    Good to see the lads in Townsville are keeping up to date with the latest UAV technology: – what little there is of it! The ADF should have more UAV but for the huge salaries (sit down money) of the top-heavy crew in Canberra

    Reply

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