Cavalry dismounts to attack

Troopers from the 2nd Cavalry Regiment conducted anti-armour stalks at Piccadilly Gate, Townsville Field Training Area, in February to test their dismounted capability.

CAPTIONTrooper Lachlan Hinspeter, of 2nd Cavalry Regiment, dismounts from an Australian light armoured vehicle at Townsville Field Training Area, Queensland. Story and photos by Captain Brittany Evans.

The training was a combination of live-fire using the 84mm Carl Gustaf and EF88 Austeyr weapons, allowing A and B Squadron to focus on conducting stalks as a dismounted element.

The squadrons undertook section live-fire attacks, including a full-mission profile, enemy-threat picture, and proved their ability to neutralise enemy armoured vehicles.

Troop Sergeant Emilio Escobar said the purpose of anti-armour stalks was to eliminate enemy targets while moving on foot in small teams to maintain a low profile.

“It is within our remit to undergo anti-armour stalk training, where we get in, conduct a hit and get out,” Sergeant Escobar said.

“As much as we are a mounted element, especially in regard to reconnaissance, we still need to be proficient in the conduct of our dismounted actions.

“The dismounted element allows us to interdict and conduct an ambush. We can deny the enemy some form of action and mobility in our area of operations.

“It gives us more of a holistic approach as to what a soldier in the Australian Army can do. We have to be proficient at both mounted and dismounted tactics.”

CAPTIONTrooper Lachlan Hinspeter, of 2nd Cavalry Regiment, during an anti-armour stalk scenario at Townsville Field Training Area, Queensland.


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